lunes, 20 de marzo de 2017

In Genesis1 the days weren´t literal days of 24 hours




And other sheep I have, which are not of this fold: them also I must bring, and they shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold, and one shepherd

I once thought this was “the others” with the blood of Adam UNTIL I met Eli and Joel.  Joel is a man of humble heart and just kept saying there were the Elohim and everyone else.  Later at dinner Joel took a napkin and folded it into “folds”.

Since then Eli taught me the two stick prophecy (Ezekiel 37.16).  Along with Jer 31.31.

Here we have those Jesus was speaking to – the Sheep of Israel living in Judea, and the majority of the Isaac Son’s DISPERSED in many nations.  TWO FOLDS.  You can also think of this as the division between the Northern house “ISRAEL” and the southern house (Judah and Benjamin).  In Either case – I am now certain this is what Jesus was talking about.


Having said that the one leg a few of the “others” have to stand on is called the “Broken Cistern”.  Here we have Male Adamites mixing in w other nations.  The offspring (at least first generation – Bible says could go 10 generations (Deut 23.2) would have the BLOOD of Adam.  I call these “Wild” olive branches.  WILD by Phenotype, Natural by BLOOD KIND.   It is my contention God places a few of the less rebellious angel souls into these Temples.

– The one question that I get stumped on is the 6 days of creation.  And evening and morning were the first day…   I have a way w Quantum Physics to explain this and I KNOW day meant Yom or Age, but it is hard to debate.

The professor


Pastor Eli James´s answer.
To get a complete understanding of Genesis 1, we have to start with the concept of Yowm, the Hebrew word translated as “day” in Genesis 1.  It is true that this word is usually meant to designate a 24-hour day, but this is not always the case.  We find that, in Scripture, the Hebrew word yowm has exactly the same range of meanings as the English word day has. The meanings of both words range from a 24-hour day to an unspecified length of great age, as represented by the English words, eon and era.
            
While it is often difficult for the amateur to recognize the origin of English words from the Hebrew mother tongue because the two languages seem to be so different. However, the connection between aeon or eon and yom (Strong's yowm) is not so difficult to understand since the sounds are very similar. Therefore, the translation of yowm in the Genesis 1 passages to aeon is also a good choice. We did not use this choice in the body of our discussion since eon or aeon do not appear in the King James Versions and Strong's. -  “The Days of Genesis,” http://www.accuracyingenesis.com/day.html
            
The quoted article cites a wealth of Scripture which backs up the fact that the Hebrew word yowm cannot be arbitrarily assumed to mean a 24 hour-day.   But this is what the Creationists do, without any justification.   Assertions are not facts.  Creationism is based on numerous false assumptions about Scripture, all of which conflict with natural history.  The reason they conflict with natural history is because these creationists do not care to consider the alternative meanings of the relevant Hebrew words. Their refusal to consider these alternative meanings proves that they are only interested in promoting a particular dogma.
            
There is simply no doubt that, when we speak of “days” in Genesis 1, we are speaking of eons, not literal 24-hour days, especially since G1 does not record the sun and stars appearing in the sky until the fourth day.  Concerning the first three “days” of G1, how can anyone speak of a literal 24-hour day when there is literally no sunlight?  The root meaning of the word yowm is “to be hot,” meaning the heat of the day caused by sunlight.  The more we consider the meanings of the Hebrew words, the more we realize that the creationist interpretation is contradicted by the Hebrew. 
            
Bible skeptics have asked the question: “How can there be an evening and a morning if there is no sun to set and rise?”  Good question!!

The fact is that, since it was discovered that the earth goes around the sun, not vice versa, many theologians have argued that the days of Genesis 1 are not literal.
            {For those interested in a scholarly debate about this fourth day, here two good articles:  http://www.reasons.org/resources/non-staff-papers/greg-moore-does-old-earth-creationism-contradict-genesis-1 ; http://www.asa3.org/ASA/education/origins/genesis.htm }


THE EVENING AND THE MORNING

The fact is that the KJV was translated by scholars who had little or no scientific knowledge.  It follows that any passages of Scripture that deal with natural history could not possibly be translated by them, except from the perspective of 17th Century knowledge.  Likewise, the KJV translators were very poor at understanding the Hebrew idioms that cannot be translated literally.  I have demonstrated this fact in my book, The Great Impersonation, and in many other writings.
            
The next author makes the point, which I have often enunciated, that the translator’s first job is to translate, not EDITORIALIZE or interpret.  Regarding the poor quality of the KJV translation, this author states,
            
Beautiful English is not so good, if it gives us only an approximation to the original (and that not a close one), as a rougher and less polished English, which gives the original as nearly as possible as it stands. Moreover, the change in the mode of presenting the matter to be communicated is a serious change, and without warrant.
When I read from Genesis i. to ii. 3 in the English Bible, I am as one listening to a narration; when I read the same portion in Hebrew, I am as one in the presence of God, the living God in action…

Our authorized version, with its many words which have changed their meaning (some of them altogether) since it was written; with its many italic words, put in to make it like English; with its want of uniformity as to the use of the same word in English for the same word in the original (this last because of the king’s order, and with the view of showing the largeness of the English vocabulary, &c. &c.), is still (all that notwithstanding) a precious gift from God to the English people. But if it led the way, faith would follow on, through grace, to something better. -  George V. Wigram,  Examination of the Hebrew Bible as to the Structure and Idiom of the Language.
            {Source:  http://www.sedin.org/propeng/oldt_gen.htm  }
            
Most translators, especially creationists, treat the concept of “day” and “evening and morning” in G1as literal.  This literal interpretation has led to enormous contradictions with established science that cannot be reconciled.  The problem is in the translations and the interpretations.  The problem does not lie in the Hebrew.   If we make the effort choose the alternative Hebrew meanings of words to fit the context, then we find that there is no contradiction with natural science.
            
Just as with the word yowm, the expression, evening and morning can have a non-literal meaning.  After having researched this subject probably more than any other Bible scholar – certainly in terms of trying to reconcile the Bible with natural history – I have concluded that this expression, “the evening and the morning” is an idiom which describes a phase.  Thus, day 1 is phase 1, day 2 is phase 2, etc.
            

This is not just idle speculation on my part.  Some Hebrew scholars have suggested the same idea:
           
Some claim yôm attached to a number (i.e., ordinal, “first, second, third,” etc.) requires a 24-hour-day interpretation. However, Bible scholars dispute that. For example, noted Hebrew scholar Gleason L. Archer states the ordinal simply defines a symbolic unit of time and “serves as no real evidence for a literal 24 hour day concept on the part of the Biblical author.” Archer also points out that the days of creation do not bear a definite article in Hebrew (i.e., “the first day,” “the second day,” etc.). He states, “In Hebrew prose of this genre, the definite article was generally used where the noun was intended to be definite... Thus they [the days of creation] are well adapted to a sequential pattern, rather than to strictly delimited units of time. -  The Days of Creation:
A Closer Look at Scripture, by 
Jon W. Greene
            
Genesis 1 describes a sequence of phases of indeterminate length.
    
The idea is similar to that of sowing and reaping, or beginning a project at a specific time and allowing the process to complete itself, like baking a cake.  The dough needs so much time to thoroughly bake before it can be taken out of the oven, cool off, spread the frosting on, and finally serve it to the guests.  Gathering the ingredients for the dough is the beginning of the phase.  The phase ends with a decorated cake.  This expression must be seen in the light of the Hebrew expression, “go out and come in” (Deut. 31:2 and 2 Chron. 1:10), which means “one’s daily activities,” or “one’s daily routine.”  

In the case of Moses, it literally means, “I can no longer perform my every day duties as the leader of the children of Israel.”  Rather than take this expression, which I will call EM (acronym of “evening and morning”), as referring to any kind of literal evening or morning, EM must be taken to mean “beginning and ending,” or duration of a particular phase, from its inception to its completion.  Since there was no sunlight until the fourth “day,” the first three evenings and mornings cannot possibly be literal!  

Certainly, there could not have been a setting or rising sun, by which these terms are defined!  And this would suggest that the other seven days are not literal either.  From this perspective, the imposition of the idea of 24-hour days is completely wrong.  It was an editorial decision made by an editorial board that was not qualified to make such decisions.
            
Here is a commentary that shares my views on this expression, which will demonstrate that EM should not be taken literally.
            
That the Hebrew word for "day," yom, can mean a period of time other than 24 hours is abundantly evident.  In Genesis 2:4 we read, "In the day that the Lord god made the earth and heavens..." (RSV). "Day" here refers to all the creations days, whatever we believe about their length. In fact, any student of Scripture can find at least nine meanings of yom. (Perhaps the easiest way is to use a computerized word search.) While it does most often refer to a 24-hour period, it is also used to mean time, today, forever, continually, an age, a life span, and perpetuity.
            
Perhaps the greatest obstacle to acceptance of the six creation days as long epochs is the "evening and morning" refrain framing each day's creation events. In fact, I have often seen it argued in creationist literature that this expression seals the case for a 24-hour interpretation. But the argument simply does not hold, and the basis for my statement is the Bible itself, not some obscure linguistic reference.
            
"Evening and morning" is an idiomatic expression in Semitic languages. Like all idioms, its meaning is nonliteral but clearly understood by native speakers. The phrase "evening and morning" can, like yom, denote a long and indefinite period. The Old Testament itself unambiguously uses the "evening and morning" phrase in just such a way. In Daniel 8 we read the account of Daniel's ram and goat vision and the interpretation given by Gabriel. The vision covers many years; some commentators believe the time has not yet been completed. Daniel 8:26 says, "The vision of the evenings and the mornings that have been given to you is true, but seal up the vision for it concerns the distant future" (RSV). 

In Hebrew manuscripts, "the evenings and mornings," is not in the plural but in the singular, identical to the expression we find in Genesis 1. Translated literally, the verse would read, "And the vision of the evening and the morning that has been given you." Here we have a clear indication from scriptural usage that this phrase does not demand a 24-hour-day interpretation and can refer to an indefinite epoch.

https://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif

YOWM

To get a complete understanding of Genesis 1, we have to start with the concept of Yowm, the Hebrew word translated as “day” in Genesis 1.  It is true that this word is usually meant to designate a 24-hour day, but this is not always the case.  We find that, in Scripture, the Hebrew word yowm has exactly the same range of meanings as the English word day has. The meanings of both words range from a 24-hour day to an unspecified length of great age, as represented by the English words, eon and era.
            
While it is often difficult for the amateur to recognize the origin of English words from the Hebrew mother tongue because the two languages seem to be so different. However, the connection between aeon or eon and yom (Strong's yowm) is not so difficult to understand since the sounds are very similar. Therefore, the translation of yowm in the Genesis 1 passages to aeon is also a good choice. We did not use this choice in the body of our discussion since eon or aeon do not appear in the King James Versions and Strong's. -  “The Days of Genesis,” http://www.accuracyingenesis.com/day.html




Notes from Loren Pedersen:

Each "day" of the Creation Story begins in darkness and ends in light.

The "darkness" of each "day" originates from the darkness/death/destruction/chaos found in Gen 1:2, which is as a consequence of the Luciferian Rebellion and the Angel Wars, also known as the "Gap Theory", which is not theory, but fact, provable by a deep analysis of Scripture.

The "light" of each "day" originates from the "Light" spoken forth by God into Lucifer's and the fallen angel's darkness. "Let there be Light!", as God spoke forth on Day (Age) One.

And what did God do next, after He had "spoken" forth His Light into the darkness? 

"God saw that the light was good; and God SEPARATED the light from the darkness."

The word "separate" in this context, as well as in the following Days (Ages), denotes JUDGMENT!

During the first Age (Day One), God JUDGED both His Light and Lucifer's/fallen angel's darkness, and found His Light to be indeed superior. And then He SEPARATED His Light from Lucifer's darkness.

In a sense, God then placed, from Day/Age One through Day/Age Six - the Six Ages of Restoration - that which had "fallen" into a "sandbox" existence, so that the "contagion" of sin, rebellion, death, destruction, chaos would be "contained" and could not affect/impact the unfallen 2/3rds of Creation still loyal unto God.

This fallen 1/3 of Creation, this "sandbox", has an "expiration date" affixed to it, as detailed towards the end of Revelation.

In spite of all the alternate timelines and alternate realities generated by the enemy since their initial "war in the heavens" eons ago, they will all comes to an END at the final judgment! when this fallen 1/3 will be judged completely!

The Seventh Day (Age) is an overarching "Age of Grace", that has transpired over thousands of Earth years, if not longer (millions and billions is not out of the question), but which will transition directly into the Seventh Seal "wrath of the Lamb of God"!

This fallen 1/3 is the "realm" we exist in. And this planet Earth is our personal Exodus from out of Egypt, the dark kingdom by which the souls of Mankind had been held hostage and in bondage to the dark forces.

Adam and Eve failed in their mission. Which gave reason for the Second Adam - our literal Elder Brother Jesus, First Born of many "begottens" who would follow in His Image and Likeness - to come directly into this fallen 1/3 and rescue us from our fallen state.

It was and is God's will for each of us to have our own free will. But with our own free will comes the responsibility to accept and follow our Elder Brother - the Author and Finisher of our faith, as well as Creator of our Predestined Eternal Destinies from the time before Creation itself ..

or to follow the one who offers truth, but delivers eternal lies; who offers freedom, but delivers eternal bondage; who offers light, but delivers eternal darkness; who offers life, but delivers eternal death.

Choose this day (age) whom you will serve!

The choice is crystal clear. Choose Jesus!

----------------------------------------------------------

No hay comentarios.:

Publicar un comentario

Suscríbete al blog y recibe actualizaciones por email

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner